Our Services

Wildlife Tours

Most leisure travellers visiting South Africa spend a portion of their holiday on safari at one of the many game parks on offer. But if your time is limited, or you just can't get enough of our wildlife, we have a number of options to choose from, all conveniently close to Johannesburg and Pretoria. Walk with the elephants at the Elephant Sanctuary, learn more about cheetah and wild dog at the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre, or get close to a variety of game at the Rhino and Lion Nature Reserve. A full day in the Pilanesberg will also give you a great taste of the African bush.

Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre

WCHC-1 or WCHC-2
DURATION:
6 - 7 hours
AVAILABILITY:
View full description for details
PICK-UP TIME:
View full description for details
MEALS:
Not included
ENTRANCE FEES:
Included – guided tour

SPECIAL NOTES: 
* Transfers to and from the Cheetah Centre are on a private basis, but on arrival visitors join a public tour commencing at either 8:00am, 8:30am or 1:30pm
* Children under 6 years are not permitted on these tours                                    
The De Wildt Cheetah Centre was established by Ann Van Dyk and brother Godfrey in 1971 with the aim of breeding endangered species. Since that time the Centre's efforts have resulted in the major achievement of breeding what was once a threatened species, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus). Over the years, over 750 cheetah cubs have been born at De Wildt - a dramatic contrast to the days when the cheetah population of South Africa was estimated at a mere 700.
While the cheetah project was the base from which the Centre launched its conservation ethic, it soon widened to include other rare and endangered animals such as the wild dog, brown hyaena, serval, suni antelope, blue and red duiker, bontebok, riverine rabbit and vultures - including the very rare Egyptian vulture. Many of these have been successfully bred for later reintroduction into the wild, thus helping to repopulate areas where such species have disappeared or are no longer abundant.

During 2000, as a reaction to the declining numbers of cheetah in the wild, De Wildt spearheaded the formation of the National Cheetah Management Forum which developed a national strategy for the protection of free-roaming cheetah. One action to come from the group, was the realization of the need for a national census of free-roaming cheetah. This census was begun in 2003 and continued for three years.

The country of South Africa has awakened to the success of the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Trust. In 2002, its founder and director, Ann van Dyk, received the gold medal from the Wildlife and Environment Society; and that was followed, in 2003, by Ann being awarded the Chancellors Award from the University of Pretoria.

Nestled in the foothills of the Magaliesberg in North West Province, the Centre is situated about one hour from Johannesburg and forty-five minutes from Pretoria. It is close to the Hartbeespoort Dam, a popular destination for day excursions from Pretoria and Johannesburg. During 2009 the centre was renamed the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre. This is an exceptionally interesting tour, providing the visitor with a unique opportunity to learn more about South Africa's fascinating wildlife - and the efforts to preserve it for future generations.

TOUR WCHC-1
AVAILABILITY: Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings, daily in the afternoon
PICK-UP TIME: 07:00 or 12:00

TOUR WCHC-2
AVAILABILITY: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday mornings
PICK-UP TIME: 06:30
SPECIAL NOTES: This option is the same as tour WCHC-1 above, except that the cheetah run is added and the tour commences half an hour earlier.

  • Cheetah running
  • Safari vehicle on tour at cheetah centre
  • Cheetah mother and cub

The Elephant Sanctuary

WELS
DURATION:
5 hours
AVAILABILITY:
Daily
PICK-UP TIME:
8:45am and 12:45pm
MEALS:
None
ENTRANCE FEES:
Included

In the early 1900's, the Magaliesberg were rich in wildlife and home to abundant elephants. As a result of pressure by man, this sensitive animal disappeared from the landscape. One hundred years later the elephants have returned to this area, to a special place in the heart of the beautiful African bushveld. Nestled in the Magaliesberg Mountains only one hour from Johannesburg and Pretoria, the Elephant Sanctuary lies in a malaria-free area - the greater part within the Magaliesberg Nature Reserve. It is surrounded by natural indigenous bush and is home to impala, klipspringer, baboons, porcupine, caracal, leopard, a host of other small mammals, 350 bird species and of course, six magnificent African Elephants. Your visit will bring you close to these magnificent animals, an experience to cherish and remember forever!

 

Guests are guided on foot through The Elephant Sanctuary with guides providing in-depth information and insight into African elephants. You will be introduced to the Sanctuary's elephants in the forest area, and here you will be able to touch and interact with the elephants, including touching, feeding, interacting and walking trunk-in-hand with the elephants. You will see the special relationship that the elephant handlers share with their elephants and become a part of it!

 

Comfortable walking shoes, sunscreen and sun hat are recommended!

  • Elephant back riding
  • Walking with the Elephants

Pilanesberg Game Park

WPIL
DURATION:
12 hours
AVAILABILITY:
Daily
PICK-UP TIME:
6:00am
MEALS:
Included - early morning tea/coffee and lunch
ENTRANCE FEES:
Included

"The Volcano that gave birth to a game reserve"

The Pilanesberg National Park lies 160 km (100 miles) from Johannesburg in the Bojanala Region of North West - the "Platinum province" - and is the fourth largest National Park in South Africa, covering an area of some 57 000 hectares. The crater of a long extinct volcano is the setting of Pilanesberg National Park - a fascinating alkaline complex produced by volcanic eruptions some 1300 million years ago. Pilanesberg is one of the largest volcanic complexes of its kind in the world and has survived ages of erosion and stands high above the surrounding bushveld plains.

The early presence of man can be seen in the numerous Stone and Iron Age sites that are scattered throughout the park. Its rare rock types and structure make it a unique geological feature and the topography makes the area a feast for the eye. Here are syenite koppies, thickly forested ravines, typical bushveld and also rolling grasslands and lightly wooded areas. Off the centre of the park is Thabayadiotso, "the Proud Mountain". The beauty of Pilanesberg is reflected in a large central lake, the Mankwe Dam.

The Park was established in 1979 and game was reintroduced thanks to Operation Genesis, which at the time was the largest game translocation ever undertaken anywhere. The Park offers the visitor a wide diversity of 35 animal species, including the "Big Five", 350 bird species and 65 reptile species - all in a malaria free area.

 

We enter the Park at Manyane Gate in the east and make our way westwards, eventually reaching our lunch stop at Bakubung - 'people of the hippo'. The afternoon is spent in search of more game as we make our way back to Manyane Gate, stopping off at one of the game viewing hides en route. We return to Johanneburg in the late afternoon.

  • Pilanesberg, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Pilanesberg - Impala, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Pilanesberg, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Pilanesberg, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Mankwe Dam, Pilanesberg, July 2013 - Blue wildebeest, Zebra and Warthog. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Pilanesberg, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Mankwe Dam, Pilanesberg, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer
  • Pilanesberg, July 2013. Photograph by Eugene Armer

Lion Park

WLPK
DURATION:
5 hours
AVAILABILITY:
Daily
PICK-UP TIME:
Any time between 8:00am and 1:00pm
MEALS:
Not included
ENTRANCE FEES:
Included for the Park and cub interaction only.

SPECIAL NOTES:
* This tour is recommended for families with young children
* Game viewing is conducted in the Wilro Tours vehicle.

 

The Lion Park, situated in the middle of the Johannesburg - Pretoria complex, is an eco-tourism destination that focuses on the well-being and regeneration of the various species, in particular the endangered African Wild Dog, the rare White Lion and Cheetah. The Lion Park is neither a game reserve, nor a Zoo, but rather a breeding ground and sanctuary for important species.

Secondary to the Park's mission is the ability to provide an opportunity for people, both local and overseas tourists, to learn more about these wonderful African animals. Large grazing areas for the antelope and giraffe have been established - here you may see zebra, giraffe, gemsbok, springbok and blesbok, to name a few. They are free to roam the area and visitors are able to view them from close proximity.

The carnivore camps are separated, housing four prides of lion, a clan of cheetah, wild dog and hyena. The lion are protected from one another by barriers and fences to prevent the different prides from attacking one another as by nature, lions are fiercely protective of their territory and will become aggressive if other lions or prides enter their domain. 

Most of the lions at the Park originate from Botswana, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and northern Gauteng. When necessary, we introduce new lions from other areas to avoid inbreeding. Visitors to the Lion Park will see first-hand the comfortable conditions provided and how the animals have prospered.

Cub World at the Lion Park is set in an enclosed area, affording visitors the opportunity to walk around and enjoy the black & spotted leopard, serval, jackal and hyena. There is also the gentle 'Gambit the Giraffe', who loves a snack. The baby giraffe is not to be missed either.